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Alzheimer's Disease

Now is the time! NIA's small business programs offer up to $1.5 million in no-strings-attached funding

Michael-David KERNS, Health Scientist Administrator, Division of Extramural Activities (DEA)
If you run a small business, are thinking of starting a small business, or have an idea focused on Alzheimer's disease and Alzheimer’s-related dementias (AD/ADRD) that has a commercial side, then this blog is for you! Whether your focus is therapeutic drug development, systems of care, effects on families, or something else, there are opportunities for you through our small business research and development programs – known as SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) and STTR (Small Business Technology Transfer Research).

BSR seeks wins in a new arena: AD/ADRD

Dana PLUDE, Deputy Director, DBSR, Division of Behavioral and Social Research (DBSR)
March Madness—a time for bracket busting and bragging rights, Cinderella stories and unexpected outcomes. And, so it goes in NIA-supported research, too! We in the Division of Behavioral and Social Research have been developing our game in new directions—funding more research in Alzheimer’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease-related dementias (AD/ADRD).

Seeking your ideas for ways to enhance recruitment and retention of Alzheimer’s disease study participants

Vicky CAHANEliezer MASLIAH, Branch Chief, Office of Communications & Public Liaison (OCPL)
It’s hard to recruit people for clinical research these days. And that is doubly true if the topic is Alzheimer’s disease and its related dementias. Recruiting volunteer participants is a primary, persistent bottleneck that poses unique challenges to clinical trials researchers.

New opportunities announced for next-gen Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers grants

Richard HODESNina SILVERBERG, Director, Office of the Director (OD)
The NIA-supported Alzheimer’s Disease Centers (ADCs) have long been a crucial part of NIA’s overall Alzheimer’s disease program and have many accomplishments to their credit. During this time of expanding interest and support for Alzheimer’s research, NIA is introducing important changes to this Centers program.

A long story about a strange way to publish funding opportunities: Or, just another day at the office

Robin BARR, Director, DEA, Division of Extramural Activities (DEA)
Here we go again. Maybe. The U.S. House and Senate appropriations committees have written large increases into their appropriations bills for NIA—again in FY 2018—to expand research into Alzheimer’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease-related dementias (AD/ADRD).

A new era of clinical trials in Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias

Laurie RYAN, Chief, Dementias of Aging Branch, Division of Neuroscience (DN)
You may have already heard that the NIA has awarded a new cooperative agreement establishing the Alzheimer’s Clinical Trial Consortium (ACTC). We expect the ACTC to accelerate and expand studies for therapies in Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. We hope you’ve also heard that the funding opportunity for ACTC trials is open. The first submission date for applications is March 29 and we strongly encourage interested investigators to reach out to the ACTC leadership and NIA well in advance.

Beginnings: Our first steps in making awards in FY 2018

Robin BARR, Director, DEA, Division of Extramural Activities (DEA)
The new fiscal year started on October 1, and we began it with hope in our hearts for continued good news on our budget. Our increased appropriations in FY 2017 allowed us our most generous funding lines in our general allocation in many years, along with a positive windfall for research in Alzheimer’s and related dementias. Still, we started the year again on a now-familiar continuing resolution, which holds our current funding to the FY 2017 level—at least until December 22.

Targeting a prize for Alzheimer's and related dementias research

Richard HODES, Director, Office of the Director (OD)
In December 2016, the President signed the 21st Century Cures Act (P.L. 114-255)—legislation that included many components relevant to the NIH—into law. One requires the NIH to support and report on prize competitions in biomedical research that can advance a field and potentially improve health outcomes. NIA now stands ready to join the action, by initiating the first step in a prize for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD) research.

Yes - Researchers in the basic biology of aging can be funded with Alzheimer's money

Felipe SIERRA, Scientific Executive, Division of Aging Biology (DAB)
The nation has made Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related dementias (ADRD) a top research priority, through additional substantial funding from Congress. While aging is the major risk factor for AD and ADRD, many investigators in the biology of aging research community questioned whether their expertise would be recognized as valuable. Analysis of last year’s AD-related funding opportunity announcements suggests that participation of basic researchers with little or no previous experience in Alzheimer’s research is crucial.

Dementia prevention: What does the evidence tell us?

Richard HODES, Director, Office of the Director (OD)
According to the latest projections, by 2050, our world will experience the sobering reality of 131 million people with dementia. By then, many of today’s adults will develop Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia—unless research can change that course. NIA already funds a wide range of trials designed to test interventions that may be effective against dementia. While research moves forward, what can we tell the public and clinicians today about actions they might take to protect cognitive health?