About NIA

NACA meeting: September 21–22, 2010

General Information/Staff Awards

Dr. Stanley Rapoport, Brain Physiology and Metabolism Section, was invited to act as a Dozor Visiting Scholar at the Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev of Beer-Sheva, Israel. His term as a visiting Scholar spanned from April 15-April 26, 2010.

2010 NIH FARE Award WinnersThe NIH Fellows Award for Research Excellence (FARE) is an annual competition that provides recognition for outstanding scientific research performed by intramural fellows. The winners each receive a travel stipend to attend a scientific meeting where they present their abstract, either as a poster or a seminar. The winners also present their work at one of the FARE poster sessions that follow each Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series (WALS) 2010/2011 seminar, and also serve as a judge for the FARE 2011 competition. The NIA had 12 NIH FARE Award winners:

  • Suhasini Avvaru, LMG
  • Chandrika Canugovi, LMG
  • Luca Caracciolo, BPMS
  • John Delaney, LG
  • Kathleen Griffoen, LNS
  • Annemarie Koster, LEDB
  • Sara Palumbo, BPMS
  • Loukia Parisiadou, LNG
  • Michelle Potter, LNS
  • Morten Scheibye-Knudsen, LMG
  • Xianhua Wang, LCS
  • Bingxue Yan, LCMB

Recipients of the 2010 NIH Director’s Award - These individuals were awarded in recognition of their participation as members of the Alzheimer’s Disease HBO Project, where the compelling story of Alzheimer’s Disease research and care was brought to new and important audiences through the multi-media, The Alzheimer’s Project: Momentum in Science. The incredible effort by NIA staff and leadership provided a front row seat at the laboratory bench and honored people with Alzheimer’s disease and their families, in keeping with NIH’s mission to disseminate information about research and to address the health, well being, and special needs of the population, in this case, older Americans.

The Alzheimer’s Project Group:
Dr. Marcelle Morrison-Bogorad, Director, Division of Neuroscience
Dr. Steve Snyder, Deputy Director, Division of Neuroscience
Dr. Dallas Anderson, Health Scientist Administrator, Division of Neuroscience
Dr. Neil Buckholtz, Health Scientist Administrator, Division of Neuroscience
Dr. Marilyn Miller, Health Scientist Administrator, Division of Neuroscience
Dr. Suzana Petanceska, Health Scientist Administrator, Division of Neuroscience
Dr. Creighton Phelps, Health Scientist Administrator, Division of Neuroscience
Dr. Laurie Ryan, Health Scientist Administrator, Division of Neuroscience
Dr. Nina Silverberg, Health Scientist Administrator, Division of Neuroscience
Dr. Molly Wagster, Health Scientist Administrator, Division of Neuroscience
Vicky Cahan, Director, Office of Communications and Public Liaison
Margaret Vaughn, M.A., Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Communications and Public Liaison
Jennifer Watson, M.A., Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Communications and Public Liaison

Federal Report Details Health and Economic Status of Older Americans (Media Availability)

July 19, 2010 -- Today’s older Americans enjoy longer lives and better health than did previous generations. These and other trends are reported in Older Americans 2010: Key Indicators of Well-Being, a unique, comprehensive look at aging in the United States from the Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics.

Proposed NIH/NIA Legislation:
New NIH/NIA Legislation:

OCPL Publications and Related Activities

The following new publications and other products were completed:

  • Comer saludablemente después de los 50 años (Healthy Eating After 50 AgePage)
  • Connections ezine (Spring/Summer 2010)
  • El cuidado de la piel (Skin Care AgePage)
  • Spotlight on Aging Research research update (Vol. 3, No. 1)
  • New NIHSeniorHealth topics: Gum (Periodontal) Disease and Creating a Family Health History

The following publications and other products were updated or reprinted:

  • Caring for a Person with Alzheimer’s Disease: Your Easy-to-Use Guide from the National Institute on Aging
  • Consejos para dormir bien (A Good Night’s Sleep AgePage)
  • Dietary Supplements AgePage
  • El envejecimiento y el alcohol (Alcohol Use in Older People AgePage)
  • End of Life: Helping With Comfort and Care
  • Getting Your Affairs in Order AgePage
  • Healthy Aging – Lessons from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging
  • Shingles AgePage
  • Stroke AgePage
  • Talking With Your Doctor

(For more information about NIA’s publications or NIHSeniorHealth, contact Vicky Cahan, Director, OCPL, Ph: 301-496-1752.)

National Research Council. International Differences in Mortality at Older Ages: Dimensions and Sources. Commissioned papers from the Panel on Understanding Divergent Trends in Longevity in High-Income Countries. National Academies of Science. 2010.

Since the mid 19th century, the world has experienced unprecedented increases in life expectancy. While the United States has never led the world in life expectancy at birth and at older ages, we were catching up to the record holding countries (Iceland, the Netherlands, Norway, and Sweden) by the 1950s and remained relatively close to them until 1980. Since 1980 however, the United States has been lagging behind many other industrialized countries in life expectancy at age 50, and this is particularly true for US women. Since 1980, the pace of gains in life expectancy of older US women has slowed markedly compared to other industrialized countries. During the last 26 years, the gains in US female life expectancy at age 50 were about half of those in Italy, France and Australia, and less than 40% that of Japan. This divergence has remained unexplained and the NIA has recently announced an initiative to tackle this question (see RFA on Regional and International Differences in Health and Longevity at Older Ages (R01) at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AG-11-004.html. NIA sponsored a National Research Council Panel which studied this issue, and a volume of papers exploring potential explanations, entitled “International Differences in Mortality at Older Ages: Dimensions and Sources” is available at http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12945 .

National Research Council. Accounting for Health and Health Care: Approaches to Measuring the Sources and Costs of Their Improvement. National Academies of Science. June 21, 2010.

Health and health care in the 21st century United States can be partially characterized by a few indisputable trends. The country is devoting a large and growing share of its resources to medical care, spending $2.3 trillion, or 16 percent of gross domestic product (GDP), on it in 2007. That figure is projected to rise to perhaps $4.2 trillion, or 20 percent of GDP, by 2016. The budgetary pressures being created have led to growing criticism of the productivity of U.S. health care. As the population continues to age, the strain that will be put on publicly funded programs such as Medicare will only elevate the debate about how best to meet the nation’s health care needs. One factor contributing to the trend of rising expenditures is the ever-expanding and increasingly sophisticated array of life-extending and life-enhancing treatments produced by medical research. In addition, the body of knowledge about the effect of nonmedical factors—such things as diet, exercise, and environment—on people’s health continues to grow. For all these advances, a gaping hole in information still exists. Relative to knowledge about health care expenditure and medical science, much less is known about the return that individuals, and society in general, receive for the investment in health. Given the massive amount of resources that are spent publicly and privately, it is astonishing that so little effort has been made to systematically assess what we are buying for this investment.

National Research Council. Conducting Biosocial Surveys: Collecting, Storing, Accessing, and Protecting Biospecimens and Biodata. Report of Panel on Collecting, Storing, Accessing, and Protecting Biological Specimens and Biodata in Social Surveys. National Academies of Science. June 25, 2010

Recent years have seen a growing tendency for social scientists to collect biological specimens such as blood, urine, and saliva as part of large-scale household surveys. By combining biological and social data, scientists are opening up new fields of inquiry and are able for the first time to address many new questions and connections. But including biospecimens in social surveys also adds a great deal of complexity and cost to the investigator's task. Along with the usual concerns about informed consent, privacy issues, and the best ways to collect, store, and share data, researchers now face a variety of issues that are much less familiar or that appear in a new light.

In particular, collecting and storing human biological materials for use in social science research raises additional legal, ethical, and social issues, as well as practical issues related to the storage, retrieval, and sharing of data. For example, acquiring biological data and linking them to social science databases requires a more complex informed consent process, the development of a biorepository, the establishment of data sharing policies, and the creation of a process for deciding how the data are going to be shared and used for secondary analysis--all of which add cost to a survey and require additional time and attention from the investigators. These issues also are likely to be unfamiliar to social scientists who have not worked with biological specimens in the past. Adding to the attraction of collecting biospecimens but also to the complexity of sharing and protecting the data is the fact that this is an era of incredibly rapid gains in our understanding of complex biological and physiological phenomena. Thus the tradeoffs between the risks and opportunities of expanding access to research data are constantly changing.

Conducting Biosocial Surveys offers findings and recommendations concerning the best approaches to the collection, storage, use, and sharing of biospecimens gathered in social science surveys and the digital representations of biological data derived there from. It is aimed at researchers interested in carrying out such surveys, their institutions, and their funding agencies.

Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics. Older Americans 2010: Key Indicators of Well-being. July 20, 2010.
This publication provides a comprehensive picture of our older population’s health and well-being. It is the fifth chartbook prepared by the Forum, which now has 15 participating federal agencies. As with the earlier volumes, readers will find here an accessible compendium of indicators drawn from the most reliable official statistics. The indicators are again categorized into five broad groups: population, economics, health status, health risks and behaviors, and health care. www.agingstats.gov.

NIA News Releases

The following press releases and announcements were distributed to audiences in print and on the Internet:

(For more information about OCPL’s media activities, contact Vicky Cahan, Director, OCPL, Ph: 301-496-1752)

Meetings and Exhibits

NIA exhibited at the following conferences:

  • American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, Phoenix, AZ
  • Medical Library Association, Washington, DC
  • National Association of Area Agencies on Aging (N4A), St. Louis, MO
  • National Association of Hispanic Nurses, Washington, DC
  • VA Conference: Supporting Veterans at Home, Arlington, VA

NIA/ADEAR exhibited or disseminated materials at:

  • 50+ Employment Expo, North Bethesda, MD
  • Black Mental Health Alliance for Education and Consultation, Baltimore, MD
  • DB Cares Health and Wellness Fair, Silver Spring, MD
  • OD/OAR Spring into Health, NIH campus
  • US Patent and Trade Office Wellness Fair, Alexandria, VA
  • Women’s Health Week, NIH campus

NIA staff meets with staff from the Alzheimer’s Association and the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America

(For more information about OCPL’s meetings and exhibits, contact Vicky Cahan, Director, OCPL, Ph: 301-496-1752. For more information about meetings with professional organizations or associations, contact Dr. Tamara Jones, Legislative Officer, Ph: 301-451-8835.)

Awards

OCPL received the following awards:

  • Association of Marketing and Communication Professionals AVA 2009 Platinum award for Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer’s Disease video, in the Video/Film/Informational category
  • NIH Plain Language Awards awarded for:
    • Alzheimer's Disease: Unraveling the Mystery (Bronze)
    • Caring for a Person with Alzheimer's Disease: Your Easy-to-Use Guide from the National Institute on Aging (Gold)
    • Choosing Nutrient Dense Foods Video – NIHSeniorHealth (Gold)
    • Exercise and Physical Activity: Your Everyday Guide from the National Institute on Aging (Gold)
    • Healthy Aging: Lessons from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (Bronze)
    • Older Adults and Alcohol: You Can Get Help (Gold)
    • What Can Prevent Walking Disability in Older People? Press Release (Silver)
    • What to Share With Your Doctor Video - NIHSeniorHealth (Silver)
  • 2010 Communicator Awards, Awards of Distinction for:
    • Saving for Retirement
    • Connections, Spring 2009
  • 2010 National Mature Media Awards
    • Caring for a Person with Alzheimer's Disease: Your Easy-to-Use Guide from the National Institute on Aging (Silver)

(For more information about OCPL’s awards, contact Vicky Cahan, Director, OCPL, Ph: 301-496-1752.)